Fruit Cutting Guide | F.N. Sharp Blog


 If you were put to the task of cutting up some fruit for a salad, you’d probably have little trouble. After all, it doesn’t take a NASA scientist to slice up a few bananas and strawberries and toss in a handful of grapes. Done.

But what if you were asked to add in some dragon fruit? How about a pluot or a jackfruit? Would you be able to identify one of these AND slice and dice it like a pro? If not, then get ready to sharpen up those skills.

Here’s what you’ll learn in this guide:

An A-Z Guide to Cutting Fruit Like a Pro

Before we get to the fruit, let’s talk knives – because cutting fruit without knives is pretty hard and not recommended. And yes, we say “knives” because different kitchen knives have different skills, so using the right one for the different types of fruits will make life much easier.

The Best Knives for Cutting Fruit

From the powerhouse chef’s knife to the handy little paring knife, here are six types of knives to keep on hand for your fruit-cutting adventures.

The Chef’s Knife

The workhorse of the kitchen, the classic western-style chef’s knife is a bit bigger and heavier than other knives in a set, with its curved blade edge making it easy to spot.

The size and heft of the chef’s knife make it the perfect tool for cutting through bigger and/or denser fruits like coconut, jackfruit, papaya, cantaloupe, honeydew, watermelon and other melons.

Knife Knowledge 101: Top Uses for a Chef’s Knife

The Santoku Knife

Santoku knife with grapefruit

The Santoku knife is great for slicing and dicing fruits for tasks that require precise, uniform cuts – think perfectly sliced fruits for a pretty fruit platter or edible arrangement.

The Santoku knife is also a great alternative to the chef’s knife, especially if you have small hands. But, you’ll still want the heft of the chef’s knife when cutting through dense fruits.

Knife Knowledge 101: Top Uses for a Santoku Knife

The Utility Knife

Utility knife with sliced apples

Another all-around, go-to knife, the utility knife is great for tackling small to mid-sized fruits like apples, oranges, lemons and limes. It also comes in handy for segmenting citrus and cutting melon slices into wedges or rounds.

You can even use the utility knife to create unique garnishes, like avocado slices in the shape of a pretty rose.

Knife Knowledge 101Top Uses for a Utility Knife

The Paring Knife

Paring knife with segmented oranges

The handy little paring knife is perfect for delicate, in-hand work like peeling apples and pears, hulling strawberries, trimming and segmenting citrus fruits, and coring tomatoes (yes, they really are a type of fruit).

The paring knife is also a great tool for creating pretty garnishes, like the tomato rose in this appetizer recipe.

Knife Knowledge 101Top Uses for a Paring Knife

The Boning Knife

Boning knife removing pineapple bark

The boning knife doesn’t have to be reserved for the meats! It can also be used for preparing fresh fruit for platters and decorative arrangements thanks to its thin, semi-flexible blade.

Use the boning knife to peel the skin or rind off fruits like melons and mangoes and removing pineapple bark without carving away too much of the fruit beneath.

Knife Knowledge 101Top Uses for a Boning Knife

The Bread Knife

Bread knife with cantaloupe

No need to reserve this one just for bread! The bread knife comes in handy for slicing through both delicate, squishy fruits and firm, tough fruits, especially when it has the right edge.

Use the bread knife to cut perfect slices of tomatoes, melons and citrus without covering your cutting board in juices. It’s also perfect for cutting up a pineapple!

Get All of the F.N. Sharp Essentials: The 6-Knife Set & Magnetic Knife Block

How to Cut 22 Types of Fruit

Now that you know which types of knives to keep on hand, let’s talk fruit! We’ve rounded up some of the most popular and most exotic fruits into this list, so not only will you learn the right way to slice and chop all kinds of fruit, but also how to choose them and the best way to store them for later use. 

CAUTION: Many fruits on this list are juicy and sticky. You always want to be safe while cutting, so keep a damp towel handy to wipe off your knife handles and fingers and accidentally cut anything but the fruit. 

Okay, let’s cut some fruit.

How to Cut an Apple

Kitchen knives with apples

Best Knife for the Job – Which knife you use to cut your apples depends on your desired end result, so you’ll want to keep a chef knife, Santoku knife or a utility knife on hand for slicing, along with a paring knife for peeling and coring.

How to Choose – Apples should be firm with no soft spots or obvious bruising. 

How to Cut –Never slice or peel an apple until you are ready to use it because it will quickly brown. If slicing apples for a tart or pie, you’ll want to peel the skin off first, then use a chef’s knife or Santoku knife to slice the apple in half through the core. You can cut the core out with a paring knife, then lay the flat side down on your cutting board and slice into uniform pieces. The skin can remain on the apple for a fruit salad as long as the apple is organic. Otherwise, peeling the skin is always recommended as non-organic apples tend to have wax on the outside. 

How to Store –Uncut apples can be stored on your countertop for up to a week, but for best results, store them in your crisper drawer away from other fruits and veggies. To store uncut apples or slices, drizzle the exposed parts with lemon juice to prevent browning, place them in a resealable bag or airtight container and store for up to 5 days.

Cut up Some Apples for This Recipe: Sweet & Savory Sweet Potato Bowl

How to Cut Breadfruit

F.N. Sharp Bread Knife with Breadfruit

Bread lovers rejoice – breadfruit really exists! And yes, it’s as delicious as you’d imagine. Also known as “the Caribbean potato”, breadfruit is a starchy, versatile fruit that can be enjoyed many ways. You can eat it ripe for a super sweet treat or use as a substitute for almost anything that calls for ripe mashed banana (think breads, cakes, muffins and cookies). You can even put it right in a skillet with some butter and cook until it’s just browned and crisp, then top with honey, ice cream, or whatever your taste buds call for! And for a savory treat, you can bake unripened breadfruit for a better-tasting “potato”!

Best Knife for the Job You’ll want to reach for your bread knife along with a paring or utility knife for this one.

How to Choose If you can get your hands on this exotic fruit, look for one that has black spots and sap on the outer skin. This means it’s very ripe, soft and super sweet – perfect on its own or to use in the desserts mentioned above. For an unripened breadfruit, look for one with bright green skin with no spots. 

How to Cut – You have a few different options for cutting breadfruit, depending on how you plan to use it. For breadfruit slices or chunks, first slice away about a fourth of an inch from the top and bottom to create flat surfaces. Then, stand the breadfruit upright and use a sharp knife to slice away the skin, cutting in vertical strips around the circumference. Next, slice the breadfruit in half lengthwise, then cross-wise to create quarters. Next, use your paring or utility knife to cut off the porous core and discard. Now you can continue cutting into slices, chunks, sticks, or whatever your recipe calls for.

For easy breadfruit wedges, use your bread knife to slice in half lengthwise from top to bottom, then cut the halves in half to create wedges. Next, use your paring or utility knife to cut about an inch of flesh from the top of each wedge, then insert your knife between the skin and flesh to remove the skin.

How to Store – Uncut breadfruit can be stored in a cool, dry place for about two days. Cut breadfruit can be placed in a storage container and stored in the fridge for four or five days.

How to Cut a Cantaloupe

Slicing cantaloupe with a bread knife

Best Knife for the Job You’ll want to reach for your chef knife or a scalloped edge bread knife for this one.

How to Choose Look for cantaloupe with a thick textured rind and no stem. It should have a sweet scent and a soft spot where the stem was. This means it’s ripe. 

How to Cut Before slicing into a cantaloupe, you’ve got to give the outside rind a good washing. This is because all of those bumps on the outside can harbor bacteria, so give it a good scrub with a veggie brush under the faucet and pat dry. Now, when it comes to cutting cantaloupe, there are a few different ways to do it. You can simply cut the cantaloupe in half, scoop out the inner seeds and use a spoon to scoop out little pieces of the flesh and eat as is, or cut each half into slices or wedges with the rind still intact.

If you’d rather slice or dice your cantaloupe with the rind removed, then follow along with the video below!  

How to Store If you’ve purchased a ripe melon, it really should be cut and eaten within 2 days. Never leave a ripe cantaloupe sitting on the counter at room temperature for more than 3 days. Cut melon can be refrigerated for up to 4 days.

How to Cut a Coconut

Cut up coconut on blue background

Best Knife for the Job – You’ll definitely want the heft of your chef’s knife for this one.

How to Choose Look for coconuts that feel heavy for their size. These will have a lot of “water” inside. Give it a shake. You should hear the liquid slurping around in there. Also, there should be no cracks on the outside shell. 

How to Cut We’re not going to let a little coconut intimidate us, are we? No, we’re not. But we ARE going to be careful getting one of these suckers open. 

You’ll first need to locate the three “eyes” at the stem end of the coconut and get a clean, handheld Phillips-head screwdriver ready (use some very hot water and soap to get your screwdriver clean) and test the eyes to see which one is the softest. Pierce this one with the screwdriver. Turn the coconut over and let the contents drain out into a bowl. Give it a good shake to get as much of the liquid out as possible.  

Now, we’ll want to crack that baby open to get at the meat inside. But before you go at it with a hammer, there is a much easier way – one that won’t require an unexpected trip to the emergency room. 

Preheat your oven to 400 degrees. Place your coconut on a baking sheet (one with a rim around the edge so your coconut doesn’t roll off). Bake for 20 minutes, or until the hard outer shell begins to crack. Remove and allow the coconut to cool enough so you can handle it. 

Next, wrap the coconut in a kitchen towel, holding the “tail” of the towel in one hand. Using the back edge of a chef’s knife or cleaver, hit the coconut in the same place several times. It will now be easy to pry open and you can easily separate the meat from the shell with a spoon. You can now chop, shred or grate the meat, whatever your recipe calls for. 

How to Store Unopened coconuts can be stored for up to four months at room temperature. Any grated or chopped coconut meat should be stored in a tightly-sealed container in the fridge for up to 4 days or in the freezer for up to 6 months.

How to Cut Dates

How to pit and cut dates

Best Knife for the Job – The handy little paring knife.

How to Choose – Dates naturally appear dry as dried fruit with a slight sheen and wrinkly-looking skin. Medjool dates are typically dark in color, ranging from brown to dark brown, but what you’re looking for are soft and relatively unblemished fruit (a few white spots are acceptable as they are the fruit sugars, but crystallized bits are a no-go). The process for choosing Deglet Noor dates is similar, but this variety has amber-colored skin and is slightly firmer, drier, and more elongated compared to Medjools. Avoid stale dates, which will look shriveled like a raisin with a very stiff texture. 

How to Cut – Unless you buy pitted dates, you’ll want to remove the pit before eating the fruit. To do this, use a small paring knife to cut the date lengthwise ºyou should feel the blade touch the pit). Then, put down the knife and peel the fruit open with your fingers to retrieve and discard the pit. From there, you can simply eat and enjoy, or slice or dice it up to use as a sweetener in baked goods, smoothies and shakes – just be sure to heat and oil your knife since these are sticky little suckers! 

Check out the video below to see these tips in action:

How to Store – If you plan to use the dates within a month, they can stay fresh at room temperature in a food storage container. Make sure to place the container somewhere cool and dry, such as inside a cabinet or pantry. However, if you live in a hot and humid climate, it may be more advantageous to refrigerate the dates instead. Refrigerated dates can last about half a year. For longer-term storage, you can freeze them for a year at most.

How to Cut Dragon Fruit

Dragon fruit on wooden surface

Best Knife for the Job – A chef knife, Santoku, utility or paring knife.

How to Choose – Well, if you’re like me you’ll first have to do a Google search to get a vague idea of what these look like. When choosing one, look for a fruit that is uniformly pink and slightly soft. Avoid a hard dragonfruit or one that has soft spots or a brown stem. 

How to Cut You’ll basically treat this fruit like a melon. Give the outer shell a good rinse, then cut the fruit in half and use a spoon to separate the flesh from the skin. Toss the skin when done as it’s not edible.  

If you’d rather cut the dragon fruit into wedges, slice off the top and bottom of the fruit and cut down the middle lengthwise, then cut into wedges. The skin should easily peel from each wedge without a knife or peeler.

How to Store – Uncut dragon can be stored on the counter for several days in an air-conditioned home, but can last up to 3 weeks when placed in an airtight container and stored in the crisper drawer of your refrigerator. Peeled or sliced dragon fruit can be stored in an airtight container or plastic bag for a couple of days. If you plan on storing your dragon fruit in the freezer, remove the peel and cut into cubes. Then, place the cubed dragon fruit on a baking sheet and freeze before transfering to a freezer bag and storing for up to 3 months.

How to Cut a Grapefruit

Santoku knife with grapefruit

Best Knife for the Job A chef knife, Santoku or utility knife.

How to Choose Look for smooth skin and a firm fruit that is heavy for its size. Avoid any grapefruit with obvious blemishes or discolorations, or those that are light for their size. The heft suggests how much liquid is inside a fruit. The heavier, the juicer. 

How to Cut You To cut a grapefruit into slices, slice off a little bit of the rind on one end to create a flat surface for stability, then firmly grasp the fruit with your non-dominant hand and begin slicing from one end to the other using a chef’s knife or Santoku knife.

To cut grapefruit into wedges, simply slice the fruit in half and use the tip of a chef’s or utility knife to cut along the outline of each individual wedge. You can then spoon out these wedges one at a time as you eat, or all at once to toss into a fruit salad. 

How to Store Uncut grapefruit can be stored at room temperature for up to one week, but in the fridge it will last from 2 to 3 weeks. Cut grapefruit should be wrapped tight with cling wrap and stored in the fridge for up to 4 days.

How to Cut Honeydew

Cut up honeydew in bowl

Best Knife for the Job – A chef knife, Santoku, utility knife or scalloped bread knife.

How to Choose Look for a nice, even shape with smooth skin and a bit of weight for its size. Avoid a fuzzy surface and a fruit that is light for its size. 

How to Cut We’re going to treat this melon as we did the cantaloupe and give the outside of it a good wash to remove any bacteria living on the rind. Also like cantaloupe, honeydew can be cut a few different ways. You can either cut the melon in half, remove the seeds and use a spoon to scoop out little pieces of flesh, cut the halves into wedges with rind intact, or follow along with the video for how to cut cantaloupe to create rind-free slices and dices.

How to Store Uncut honeydew can last in the fridge for up to 2 weeks. Cut melon should be wrapped tightly and stored for up to 4 days.

How to Cut Jackfruit

Plate of jackfruit with half of jackfruit

Best Knife for the Job – A chef knife or scalloped bread knife.

How to Choose When in your produce section, keep your eyes open for the thing that looks like a giant dinosaur egg. When you find it, give it a good sniff. It should give off a sweet smell. Avoid fruit that has no sweet scent as it’s not ripe yet. The fruit should also give just a little with gentle pressure. 

How to Cut Jackfruit is extremely sticky (it’s actually a form of natural latex inside), so you’ll want to oil the knife blade and the hand that will be touching the jackfruit before cutting. Do NOT oil the knife handle or the hand that will be holding the knife.

Next, begin cutting the jackfruit into rounds, about 1 1/2-2″ wide, until you reach the end of the fruit. Before cutting any more, you may have to reapply some oil to your blade and hand.  

Next, cut into each individual round to remove the harder, white center core. Once this is done you’ll be able to take what was once a closed circle and lay it into a flat line. Put the knife away, because now it’s time to use your hands to remove each yellow pod. They kind of look like giant corn kernels.  

Now, when this task is done, you will have a large bowl full of large yellow jackfruit pods. Inside these pods are smaller seeds and their covering that will need to be removed. You can either get that task out of the way now, or de-seed as you eat your way through the fruit all week – it’s up to you. Once your pods are cleaned, you can eat as is or slice and chop them into smaller pieces. 

How to Store Jackfruit pods will last in the fridge for up to one week or in the freezer for up to two months.

How to Cut Kiwi

Bowl of cut up kiwi

Best Knife for the Job – The handy little paring knife.

How to Choose Look for firm kiwi that gives just a little to gentle pressure and has no blemishes or shriveled areas. 

How to Cut Give the kiwi a good rinse and use a paring knife to peel off the brown skin if throwing in a fruit salad, then slice into thin circles. You can also try cutting the kiwi in half and using a spoon to get between the skin and flesh to scoop it out, then slice into half circles if desired.

How to Store Uncut, unripened kiwi can be stored on the counter at room temperature for up to one week. If your kiwi has ripened, you can store it for another week in the fridge. To store sliced kiwi, you can either place it in an airtight container or resealable plastic bag or wrap it tightly in aluminum foil for plastic wrap and store in the fridge for about 3 to 4 days or in the freezer for up to 3 months.

Slice up Some Kiwi for This Recipe: Italian-Style Candied Fruit

How to Cut Lemons and Limes/h4> Cutting lemons and limes

Best Knife for the Job – A chef’s knife, Santoku or utility knife.

How to Choose Look for lemons and limes that are heavy for their size and have smooth, unblemished skin. Medium to large lemons and limes are usually juicer than small ones. 

How to Cut Wash the fruit before cutting and zesting the outer skin. The skin packs a ton of flavor that can be used in baking, salad dressings, marinades – you name it. Be sure not to get any of the bitter white part, just the outer skin. If you want wedges or slices for cocktails or to plate with seafood, don’t zest first – just cut in half, then cut each half in half again, giving you 4 nice-sized wedges, or firmly hold the fruit and cut into slices from one end to the other.

How to Store Uncut lemons and limes can stay good stored on the counter for about a week, or in the refrigerator for up to a month. Cut lemon and lime wedges or slices can be stored in the fridge for a few days. To keep them from drying out, tightly wrap each wedge or slice individually in plastic wrap and store in a plastic bag or airtight container.

Cut up Some Lemon for This F.N. Sharp Recipe: Lemon Garlic Shrimp Pasta

How to Cut Mango

Sliced and whole mango on wooden surface

Best Knife for the Job – A chef knife, Santoku or utility knife.

How to Choose A ripe mango will have a nice aroma and give a little to gentle pressure. There should not be any blemishes or dark spots on the skin. 

How to Cut Mangos are delicious, but they have that large, flat pit in the center. To cut, insert your knife into the mango until you reach the pit. Then, slice horizontally against the pit, turning the mango and continuing to slice along the other side. To remove the skin from the flesh, score the flesh by cutting just until you reach the skin. Turn the skin inside out and, using a paring knife, remove flesh from the skin. 

If you want to cut your mango into slices or dices, follow along with the how-to video below:

How to Store Unripened, whole mangoes can be stored at room temperature for several days. Once ripe, the mango can be transferred to and stored in the fridge for another 5 days. Cut mango can be stored in an airtight plastic bag or container in the fridge for about a week or in the freezer for up to 6 months.

Dice up Some Mango for This Recipe: Mahi Fish Tacos With Mango Salsa

How to Cut an Orange

Paring knife with sliced oranges

Best Knife for the Job – A utility or paring knife.

How to Choose Look for oranges that are firm and heavy for their size. They should have smooth skin that is bright in color. 

How to Cut The rind of an orange is also great for baking and seasoning, so you may want to wash well and use a zester if removing the peel. You can either leave the rind intact and slice in half, then cut into slices or wedges. If your recipe calls for removing the rind, first cut off the top and bottom of the orange and set it down on your cutting board with a flat side down. Then, use your knife to slice off the remaining peel and pith (the white part) all the way around. From here, you’ll follow the natural lines of the orange segments with your knife to remove the individual segments. This process is known as “supreming” or “segmenting”.

Check out this video to see how to cut and segment an orange in action:

How to Store Whole, uncut oranges can be stored at room temperature for up to 5 days or in the fridge for up to 2 weeks. To store orange halves, wedges or slices, tightly wrap in plastic wrap, place in an airtight container and store in the crisper drawer for up to four days.

Cube Up an Orange for This F.N. Sharp Recipe: Oven-Baked Salmon With Cucumber Salad

How to Cut a Papaya

Chef knife with papaya and pear

Tools: A chef knife or scalloped bread knife.

Best Knife for the Job – A chef knife or scalloped bread knife and/or a paring knife for peeling.

How to Choose You’ll want a papaya that isn’t fully ripe yet. These will look mostly yellow with a little green. Papayas are fully ripe when they are completely bright yellow. The unripe fruit should also be a bit firm to the touch and heavy for its size. You really don’t want a papaya that is too soft and mushy. 

How to Cut Give the fruit a rinse under the faucet, pat dry, then cut it in half and scoop out the seeds. The seeds are edible and are a great addition to a salad or on top of some ice cream. The skin is also edible, so you can leave it on or peel it off with a veggie peeler or paring knife. Then cut the papaya into your desired shape and size and enjoy. 

How to Store Ripe papaya can be stored in a plastic bag in the refrigerator for up to 1 week. Cut papaya will last about 3 days when stored in an airtight container in the fridge.

How to Cut a Peach

Chef knife with peaches

Best Knife for the Job – A chef knife, Santoku or utility knife.

How to Choose Look for peaches that are firm with nice, fuzzy skin. They should give to gentle pressure when ripe and ready to eat. Avoid any with blemishes or bruising. If the peach is at all green, set it down and select another – this will never ripen. 

How to Cut Wash the peach right before using. If you’re going to cook the peach, you’ll want to peel the skin first because it will become tough with heat. An easy way to remove the skin is to cut an X through it and lower the peach into boiling water for 1 minute, Remove and plunge into ice water to shock. The skin should pull off easily. Once peeled, the peach flesh will start to darken so you’ll want to cook with it or eat immediately. 

If slicing, poke your knife into the middle of the peach to get a sense of where the pit is. Cut into one side of it along the pit, then repeat on the other side. Trim the two other remaining sides, then slice as desired for a salad or fruit and cheese plate. 

How to Store Uncut peaches can be stored at room temperature for up to 2 days. Cut peaches can last in the fridge for up to 4 days.

Cut up Some Peaches for This Recipe: Chicken and Peach Saltimbocca Kebabs

How to Cut a Pear

Sliced and whole pears on white background

Best Knife for the Job – A utility or paring knife.

How to Choose Look for pears that are firm but give slightly to gentle pressure. There should be no bruises or soft spots. 

How to Cut Give the pear a wash first and cut in half lengthwise, then cut each half into quarters. Next, place the quarters cut side down and angle your knife to remove the core. You can then serve the quarters as is or place them flat on the cutting board and continue slicing and dicing.

How to Store If pears are slightly unripe when purchased, they can stay out at room temperature for up to 1 week. Ripe pears should be refrigerated for up to 3 days. 

Just like apples, pears brown quickly when cut into and exposed to air. To store cut pears, sprinkle with a little bit of lemon juice, then wrap tightly in plastic wrap or aluminum foil and store in a resealable plastic bag or covered container in the fridge for 3 to 4 days. 

If you want to freeze your pear slices, you’ll want to soak them in a bowl of ice and salt water for a few minutes, then rinse thoroughly and pat dry. Next, arrange the slices in an even layer on a baking sheet and freeze until firm before transferring into a freezer bag or container.

Peel Some Pears for This Recipe: Poached Pear Gingerbread 

How to Cut a Pineapple

Removing pineapple bark with boning knife

Best Knife for the Job – A chef knife, boning knife and/or scalloped bread knife.

How to Choose Pineapples should be heavy for their size and have dark, compact green leaves. Avoid any fruit with soft or dark spots. 

How to Cut Slice off the green top and very bottom off of the pineapple. If you want pineapple rings, you have two options – you can either use a core remover and slice into ½ inch slice rings all the way down, or slice the pineapple whole and use a paring knife or cookie cutter to cut out the core from the center of each ring. 

TIP Don’t toss the core. While it’s hard to chew, the core contains many important nutrients, one being bromelain, which is great in reducing inflammation in the body. You can toss pieces of the core into a fruit smoothie and reap those health benefits. 

For recipes that call for pineapple chunks or minced pineapple, slice off the top and bottom  and set it down on one of the flat sides. Then, begin cutting off the bark in strips, turning the pineapple as you make your way around the entire fruit. Once all bark is removed, trim off any leftover brown spots called “eyes”, just like a potato. 

Then, place the pineapple side down on your cutting board and cut in half. Next, cut each half into quarters and slice off the core from each piece. Then, cut your pineapple quarters into slices. For diced pineapple, turn the slices at a quarter angle and cut into cubes.

Need to see this in action? Follow along with the how-to video:

How to Store – An uncut, ripe pineapple can be stored at room temperature for 2 days or in the fridge for up to five days. Cut pineapple can be refrigerated in an airtight container for up to 1 week.

Cut up Some Pineapple for This Recipe: Pina Colada Guacamole

How to Cut a Pomegranate

Sliced and whole pomegranate on blue background

Best Knife for the Job – A utility knife or paring knife.

How to Choose Look for a pomegranate that is round and heavy for its size. Avoid any that have cuts or bruises. 

WARNING Cutting pomegranates can be a messy job and you do risk staining your clothes, so I recommend wearing an apron (like this F.N. Sharp one) or an old shirt that never leaves the house. 

How to Cut First, slice off the top of the pomegranate, then cut a slit through the skin. With the slit facing away from you, tear the fruit open. Get a deep bowl and fill with water. Next, you’ll want to rip the fruit into chunks under water and remove the seeds. The water is great because the seeds will sink (that’s the stuff you eat) but the white inedible membrane floats. Pour these off the top of the water so only the seeds remain.  

How to Store Whole pomegranates can be stored for up to a month in a cool dry place or refrigerated for up to 2 months. Seeds may be refrigerated in an airtight container for up to 5 days, or in the freezer for up to a year if frozen properly.

Grab Some Pomegranate for This Recipe: Whipped Goat Cheese and Pomegranate Tartlets

How to Cut a Pluot

Whole and sliced pluots on dish towel

Okay, you’re probably wondering “what the heck is a pluot?” This extremely sweet fruit is actually a hybrid between a plum and an apricot.  

Best Knife for the Job – A chef knife, Santoku or utility knife.

How to Choose Like a plum, the pluot should be firm with smooth skin. Avoid any that feel soft or have bruises. 

How to Cut Wash the pluot, then slice in half to remove the pit. From there, you can place one of the halves cut side down and cut into slices lengthwise.  

How to Store Ripened pluots can be refrigerated for up to 3 days. Cut pluots should be kept in an airtight container and stored in the fridge for 3 days. 

If you’re like me, you’ll never get tired of saying the word. “Honey, are we all out of pluots?” “Who ate the last pluot?” “Man, I could really go for a pluot!”

How to Cut a Starfruit

Slicing starfruit with F.N. Sharp Santoku Knife

Also known as carambola, starfruit is a sweet and sour fruit that looks like a 5-point star when sliced, making it a pretty addition to fruit platters. Apart from the stem, the entire fruit is edible – skin and all.

Best Knife for the Job – A chef’s knife, knife or utility knife.

How to Choose – Unripened starfruit will appear green in color, while ripened starfruit will appear more yellow in, although there may be some green spots. Larger starfruit is also sweeter compared to the smaller, more sour fruit.

How to Cut – Give the fruit a good wash, pat dry and place it horizontally on your cutting board. If you see any browning along the 5-point ridges, use the tip of your knife to slice them off. Next, slice off each end of the fruit, then begin slicing from one end to the other and you’ll end up with pretty, star-shaped slices of fruit. You’ll also see some seeds in the slices, which are edible but not very tasty, so you can simply remove them with the tip of your knife or your fingers.

How to Store Unripened, uncut starfruit can be stored at room temperature for about two weeks or in the refrigerator for about a month. Ripened, uncut starfruit can be stored in the fridge for about a week. Sliced starfruit should really be eaten right away, however, it can be frozen for up to 3 months – simply arrange the slices in a single layer on a baking sheet and place in the freezer for a few hours, then transfer to a freezer bag or airtight container.

How to Cut Strawberries

Using paring knife to hull strawberries

Best Knife for the Job – A utility or paring knife for hulling and slicing.

How to Choose Look for berries that are firm, plump and fully red with green, fresh-looking stems. Avoid soft, bruised or discolored berries.

How to Cut – Wash and pat dry, then use a utility or paring knife to remove the hull (the white part) underneath the stem. To do this, simply insert the tip of your knife about 45° to the hull and slide the knife around it (as if you’re tracing it out) while holding the berry still. Or you can try rotating the berry while holding the knife still – whatever feels more comfortable. Then, place the berry down on a cutting board and slice as desired.

How to Store Moisture is your enemy when it comes to storing strawberries. To keep those berries bright and fresh, avoid washing until you’re ready to eat them. You can either store them in the original container in the fridge, or you can transfer them to a different container lined with some paper towels and covered with a lid or plastic wrap. Also be sure to pick out any spoiled berries to avoid spoiling the rest of the bunch.

Slice up Some Strawberries for This Recipe: Easy Oven Dried Strawberries

How to Cut a Watermelon

Chef knife cutting watermelon

Best Knife for the Job – A chef knife, Santoku or scalloped bread knife.

How to Choose Look for symmetrically shaped watermelons that are heavy for their size. Avoid ones with cuts, dents, bruises, or are light for their size. 

How to Cut Wash watermelon well, as there is often dirt and bacteria on the rind. Once washed, you can either cut it in half, then cut into slices with the rind intact, or treat it like we did the pineapple by cutting off a bit from both ends, laying it on one of the flat ends, and trimming the rind off the entire thing, continually turning it as you go. Once the rind is removed you can cut in half, remove the seeds, and cut the melon into wedges or chunks, or use a melon baller.  

How to Store Whole watermelons can be stored at room temperature for 2 weeks. Cut watermelon should be tightly sealed and stored in the fridge for up to 4 days.

How to Cut Fruit Disguised as Vegetables 

If you’re a GOT fan, you probably remember the shock you felt when you found out who Jon Snow’s real parents were! Equally shocking to some people is the reveal that certain fruits are actually disguised as vegetables.  

Generally speaking, a fruit is a flowering plant that contains a pit or seeds inside. That means many of your favorite veggies are actually fruits – and I’m about to tell you which ones and how to choose, chop and store them.

How to Cut an Avocado

Diced and half avocado on cutting board

Best Knife for the Job – A chef’s knife, Santoku or utility knife.

How to Choose It’s hard to find ripe avocados in the store these days. You usually just see enormous mounds of shiny, light green ones. On the odd occasion, you’ll find a ripe one that appears dark green and is slightly soft to the touch. Avoid any that are way past their prime. They will look almost black and feel squishy.

How to Cut First, remove the stem to get it out of the way. Then, hold the ripe avocado in one hand and a knife in the other, cut the avocado lengthwise around the pit, turning the avocado and knife until you make a full rotation. Next, twist to separate the two halves and carefully jam your knife into the pit to remove it carefully. Once the pit is gone you can use a spoon to scoop out the flesh to make guacamole or anything else that calls for mashed avocado.

If you’d like to serve your avocado in slices, cut off the very tip of the avocado half to give you space to get between the avocado peel and the flesh. After removing the skin, place your avocado half pit-side down on your cutting board and begin slicing either lengthwise or widthwise in whatever thickness you desire.

If your recipe calls for diced avocado, hold the avocado half in your hand and begin making slices in rows lengthwise from end to end, then turn and slice across in rows. Next, set the knife down and grab a spoon to scoop out the flesh, and now you have diced avocado!

Need to see this in action? Check out the video below to learn how to slice and dice an avocado, plus a neat trick for turning the slices into an avocado rose!

How to Store If you bring home unripe avocados, they may be stored on the kitchen counter for a few days to ripen up. Ripe avocados may be stored in the fridge for 3 days, but the sooner you eat them the better. If you cut the avocado and have some leftover, squeeze a little lemon juice on it, wrap tightly, and store in the fridge for 1 day.

Slice Up Some Avocado for This Recipe: Chicken Tortilla Soup

How to Cut Cucumbers

Cutting cucumbers with chef knife

Best Knife for the Job – A chef’s knife, Santoku or utility knife for slicing and a paring knife for scoring.

How to Choose Look for smaller eggplants as they are usually sweeter. You also want it to be heavy for its size with shiny skin that is uniform in color. 

How to Cut While the skin of the eggplant is edible, some people choose to trim it off first. How you cut the eggplant will be determined by your recipe. You can simply cut whole round slices for eggplant parmesan. Or you may want to cut the eggplant in half lengthwise, then cut each half into thirds (again lengthwise) then cut these slices into smaller wedges. 

Tip To reduce bitterness, sprinkle your cut eggplant pieces liberally with salt and let them sit for an hour. This will pull out the bitter juices. Drain and prep. 

How to Store A whole eggplant may be stored at room temperature for up to 4 days. Cooked eggplant may be refrigerated for up to 3 days.

Slice and Dice Some Cucumbers for These F.N. Sharp Recipes:
Homemade Tzatziki Sauce and Herbed Pita Chips
Greek Lemon Chicken Kebabs with Talatouri Sauce

How to Cut Eggplant

Paring knife scoring eggplant

Tools: A chef knife, Santoku or utility knife for slicing and a paring knife for scoring.

Choose: Look for smaller eggplants as they are usually sweeter. You also want it to be heavy for its size and have skin that is shiny and uniform in color. 

Cut: While the skin of the eggplant is edible, some people choose to trim it off first. How you cut the eggplant will be determined by your recipe. You can simply cut whole round slices for eggplant parmesan. Or you may want to cut the eggplant in half lengthwise, then cut each half into thirds (again lengthwise) then cut these slices into smaller wedges. 

Tip: To reduce bitterness, sprinkle your cut eggplant pieces liberally with salt and let them sit for an hour. This will pull out the bitter juices. Drain and prep. 

Store: A whole eggplant may be stored at room temperature for up to 4 days. Cooked eggplant may be refrigerated for up to 3 days.

Cut Up Some Eggplant for This F.N. Sharp Recipe: Air Fryer Eggplant Fries With Marinara Dipping Sauce

How to Cut Okra

Whole and sliced okra on wood surface

Best Knife for the Job – A chef’s knife, Santoku, utility or paring knife.

How to Choose Okra should feel fuzzy, like a peach, and should be dry and firm. 

How to Cut Wash then remove the stem. Follow your recipe’s directions to cut into smaller pieces. 

Tip Cooked okra can get a bit slimy, which is pretty hard to eat, so it’s best to prepare okra with acidic foods like tomatoes. 

How to Store Uncut, raw okra can be stored in the fridge for up to 3 days. Cooked okra can be kept in a tightly sealed container in the fridge for up to 5 days.

How to Cut Peppers

Chef knife with diced peppers

Best Knife for the Job – A chef knife, Santoku, utility or paring knife, depending on the size of the pepper.

How to Choose When choosing bell peppers, look for bright, glossy skin and no shriveled spots. Jalapeno peppers should be dark green in color and also have a nice gloss to them. 

How to Cut Wash your bell pepper under the faucet, then pat dry. Next, stand the bell pepper upright on your cutting board and begin slicing down from top to bottom, slightly angling your knife towards the bottom of the bell pepper. Repeat on all sides around the core. Toss out the core, place the pieces cut side down, and slice, dice, mince or chop your bell pepper meat.

Check out this video to see how to slice and dice a bell pepper in action:

When it comes to cutting jalapeno peppers, here’s a quick reminder: while the entire pepper is hot, the REAL heat resides in the seeds, so you may want to wear some gloves while cutting. 

For jalapeno slices, wash the pepper before slicing off the stem end. Then, simply begin slicing in whatever thickness you prefer. From there, you can either leave the ribs and seeds as is, or use the tip of your knife to remove them.

If your recipe calls for thin strips or diced jalapeno, slice off the stem and slice the jalapeno in half lengthwise. You can either leave the ribs and seeds for a spicier jalapeno, or use the tip of your knife to remove them. Then, place your jalapeno halves cut side down and begin slicing into thin strips lengthwise. From there, you can turn the strips to slice in the opposite direction to create diced jalapeno. 

Tip Do NOT touch your eyes during any part of this process, unless you want to know what it feels like to have your retinas burned by the sun. 

Need to see how to cut a jalapeno in action? Check out this how-to video:

SHow to Store Both pepper varieties can be stored in a plastic bag in the fridge for up to 5 days.

Dice up Some Peppers for This Recipe: Instant Pot Turkey Chili 

How to Cut Pumpkin

Bowl of cut up pumpkinBest Knife for the Job – A paring knife for peeling and a chef knife for slicing.

How to Choose Now we’re not carving this thing for Halloween, we’re looking for an edible pumpkin. So choose one that is on the small side with few blemishes and is heavy for its size. 

How to Cut Wash the outside rind of the pumpkin thoroughly to remove any dirt or bacteria. Next, cut the pumpkin in half lengthwise and scoop out the seeds and fiber. Trim the skin with a paring knife or peeler, then roast the pumpkin whole or cut into smaller pieces. 

How to Store Whole pumpkins may be stored at room temperature for up to 1 month or in the fridge for up to 3 months. Cut pumpkin should be wrapped tightly and refrigerated for up to 5 days.

Puree Some Pumpkin for These F.N. Sharp Recipes:
Perfectly Sweet and Savory Pumpkin Ricotta Tart
Pumpkin Ravioli With an Herby Parmesan Cream Sauce

How to Cut a Tomato/h4> Santoku knife cutting a tomato

Best Knife for the Job – A chef knife, Santoku or utility knife.

How to Choose Look for shiny, unblemished skin that is vibrantly colored. Stay away from tomatoes that are mushy, bruised or splitting at the top. 

How to Cut Rinse off your tomatoes, then slice in half and then half again to create wedges for a salad. Or, you may want to keep the tomato whole and then slice thin round pieces for sandwiches. For diced tomatoes, slice in half from end to end lengthwise, then half again to turn them into quarters, then dice.

Check out this video to see how to cut tomatoes in action:

How to Store Unripened, uncut tomatoes can be stored on your countertop. Uncut, ripe tomatoes really shouldn’t be stored in the refrigerator as they can become mealy and lose flavor, but if you do have to store them in the fridge, be sure to allow them to come to room temperature before eating. 

When storing cut tomatoes, you can place tomato halves cut-side down on a paper towel and store in a container for a couple of days. Sliced or diced tomatoes should also be stored in a storage container in the fridge and used within a few days.

Dice up Some Tomatoes for This Recipe: Double-Spiced Heirloom Tomato Salsa

How to Cut Zucchini

Santoku knife with zucchini

Best Knife for the Job – A chef knife, Santoku or utility knife.

How to Choose Good zucchini is short zucchini, so look for one less than 6 inches in length. Also, the skin should be firm, shiny and slightly prickly. Avoid any zucchini with cuts and bruising. 

How to Cut There are a few different ways to cut zucchini, from slices to sticks for fries. Give the zucchini a good rinse and simply slice into 1-inch round slices, then slice in half for wedges, if you wish. For fries, slice the zucchini in half and cut the halves into halves, then slice into sticks.

How to Store Whole zucchini should not be washed until ready to use. You can store it in a perforated plastic bag in the fridge for up to 5 days. Cooked zucchini should be covered well and refrigerated for no more than 2 days.

Cut up Some Zucchini for These F.N. Sharp Recipes:
Bechamel Vegetable Lasagna
Paleo Chicken and Artichoke Sauce Tomat

We hope this fruit cutting guide has been eye opening (but not finger opening). Be sure to always keep your knives nice and sharp so they will easily slice through fruits, especially those with thick, dense rinds. And, most importantly, be sure and use the word Pluot as often as you can.

More Meal Prep Guides: The F.N. Sharp Guide to Cutting Those Veggies





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